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  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    The Week: Most Recent Home Page Posts
    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    The Week: Most Recent News+Opinion Posts
    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    The Week: Most Recent Home Page Posts
    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    The Week: Most Recent Home Page Posts
    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    The Week: Most Recent Home Page Posts
    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
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    The Week: Most Recent Home Page Posts

  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
 
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    The Week: Most Recent News+Opinion Posts

  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • 10 things you need to know today: November 21, 2014

    By <a href="/author/harold-maass" ><span class="byline">Harold Maass</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 4:58 am
    1. Obama details his immigration reform ordersPresident Obama announced Thursday that he was using his executive powers to unilaterally impose immigration reform despite gridlock over the issue in Congress. In a primetime address, Obama said he would enact measures deferring the deportation of four million undocumented immigrants, allowing undocumented parents of U.S. citizens who have been in the country five years to apply for legal residency, but with no path to citizenship. Republicans vowed to fight the moves, saying Obama had overstepped his authority by acting alone. [The Washington…
  • Obama just kneecapped Jeb Bush and Chris Christie's 2016 prospects

    By <a href="/author/jon-terbush" ><span class="byline">Jon Terbush</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 3:23 am
    President Obama on Thursday announced his much-anticipated executive action on immigration, and in doing so he lobbed a grenade squarely into the 2016 Republican primary race.Obama's order will reshape how the feds prioritize deportations of undocumented workers, shielding an estimated five million of them from being kicked out of the country. "We shall not oppress a stranger for we know the heart of a stranger — we were strangers once, too," Obama said, quoting scripture.By moving ahead solo before the new Congress is sworn in, Obama ensured Republicans will finally have to address…
  • The dangerously childish morality of liberal ObamaCare supporters

    By <a href="/author/pascal-emmanuel-gobry" ><span class="byline">Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 3:06 am
    When the Iraq War was a live issue in American politics, some of the supporters of the war made the following strange argument: Saddam Hussein was a bloodthirsty dictator; he had jails where opponents of the regime were tortured and killed. Therefore, those who opposed the Iraq War were personally responsible for the torture and death of those innocent individuals.I mention this because in the debate over health care, one often hears from liberals a different version of that infantile argument.For example, in the King v. Burwell case that was recently accepted by the Supreme Court, a…
  • It's official: The religious right is calling it quits

    By <a href="/author/damon-linker" ><span class="byline">Damon Linker</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 3:04 am
    What a difference 10 years can make.In the weeks following George W. Bush's re-election to the presidency in November 2004, with exit polls saying that the election had been decided by voters who were moved primarily by "moral values," the religious right felt giddy. Its push to get states to adopt referenda banning same-sex marriage had been wildly successful and helped to mobilize conservatives. With the greatest political champion the movement had ever known assured of four more years in the White House, the religious right began to dream of passing an amendment to the U.S. Constitution…
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    The Week: Most Recent Home Page Posts

  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Week: Most Recent Home Page Posts

  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Week: Most Recent Home Page Posts

  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
 
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    The Week: Most Recent Business Posts

  • Why you should be getting ready to ask for a raise

    By Anthony Mirhaydari
    19 Nov 2014 | 1:48 pm
    The October jobs report released Nov. 7 was met with a lukewarm response. Payroll gains totaled 214,000 jobs, down from the 240,000 average of the last five months. The average workweek was slightly longer. Wage pressure remains tepid, running at a 2 percent annual rate.But the big news was that the unemployment rate dropped to 5.8 percent — returning to a level not seen since July 2008. Much this decline has been driven by folks dropping out of the workforce, pushing the employment-to-population ratio to levels not seen since the early 1980s (although it's been improving slightly…
  • How to rescue the American family and fix the broken school system in one fell swoop

    By <a href="/author/pascal-emmanuel-gobry" ><span class="byline">Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry</span></a>
    19 Nov 2014 | 3:15 am
    Nowadays, Elizabeth Warren mostly gets talked about as a potential progressive alternative to Hillary Clinton's inevitable Democratic coronation. But it's often ill-remembered that for most her life, she was an academic. One of her most fascinating works is her book The Two Income Trap.A lot of people have probably heard of the phenomenon of the two-income trap, but it's not discussed enough. This is the basic idea: financially, having both parents in a family seems like a no-brainer — it brings in more money. But it can actually become a trap if the costs involved in having both…
  • The Federal Reserve's independence is dangerous, undemocratic, and a boon to Wall Street

    By Matt Stoller
    19 Nov 2014 | 3:06 am
    A few months ago, a former employee at the secretive Federal Reserve Bank of New York named Carmen Segarra came forward and blew a big fat whistle. She alleged that she had witnessed regulators, and specifically her boss Mike Silva, act unethically and deferentially towards an entity they were supposed to regulate, Goldman Sachs.The specifics of the allegation were as follows. Silva had allowed Goldman to do a deal with the Spanish banking giant Santander, a deal which amounted to being paid to help Santander manipulate accounting standards. Goldman had received $40 million to hold some…
  • U.S. public health advocates are worried about a historic trade deal with Asia

    By Ariel Bogle
    17 Nov 2014 | 4:50 am
    In the expensive briar patch that is American health care, generic drugs have been key to keeping costs down. But intellectual property provisions in the Trans Pacific Partnership, set to be the largest free trade deal ever and the subject of intense speculation since 2005, have public health advocates concerned about the fate of this key component of affordable health care, not only in the U.S., but worldwide.The White House believes that the TPP will be beneficial for America's economic and political presence in Asia. Others are worried that the twelve negotiating Pacific nations, from…
  • Personal finance tips: Beware of power-sucking appliances, and more

    By <a href="/author/sergio-hernandez" ><span class="byline">Sergio Hernandez</span></a>
    17 Nov 2014 | 3:09 am
    A very early 529 giftWhy wait until a child is born to start a 529 college savings plan? asked Peter S. Green at The Wall Street Journal. Anyone hoping to become a grandparent one day can open a 529 to "get the savings ball rolling early." A future grandparent who designates the beneficiary as the future parent can contribute as much as $70,000 in a single year tax free (equal to five years' worth of contributions at $14,000). When the infant arrives, the account can be transferred into his or her name. Starting early has major benefits: A 529 plan opened with an initial gift of $14,000,…
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    The Week: Most Recent Home Page Posts

  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Week: Most Recent Home Page Posts

  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
 
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    The Week: Most Recent Home Page Posts

  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
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  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
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  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • Girls on Film: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay isn't an action movie. It's a war movie.

    By <a href="/author/monika-bartyzel" ><span class="byline">Monika Bartyzel</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 3:06 am
    After two widely-acclaimed installments, the tenor has changed in the first reviews for The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1. The long-beginning of Katniss Everdeen's final fight, like Harry Potter and Twilight, has been broken into two parts — and not everyone is happy with the decision.The complaints over Mockingjay Part 1 extend beyond the perceived cynicism of stretching a wildly popular franchise as far as possible. It's a disappointment of tone, as the Hunger Games franchise moves away from many of the things that made it so popular in the first place. The Games are finally over,…
  • This week I learned that it was Snow White's mother who wanted her dead, and more

    By <a href="/author/lauren-hansen" ><span class="byline">Lauren Hansen</span></a>
    20 Nov 2014 | 3:11 pm
    Read more about the facts mentioned:A new book shows that Grimm's Fairy Tales were even scarier than first thought (The Week) 6 articles of clothing that caused riots (Mental Floss) Did Gorbachev really ask George H.W. Bush to find out who killed Laura Palmer? (Slate) Losing the htrkos in the woods (Now I Know) Listen to more of The Week's mini podcasts:Let us now praise Billy JoelRise of the machinesYour weekly streaming recommendation: Nebraska*You can also find The Week's mini podcasts on iTunes, SoundCloud, and TuneIn.* More
  • Don't change a thing: 8 inventions that never needed updating

    By Therese Oneill
    20 Nov 2014 | 10:50 am
    If someone presented you with an original 1868 Sholes and Glidden Type-Writer, and told you to write your senior thesis using it, you'd be in for a world of pain. The speed you type with on your close-set keys would be gone, and most of your fingers would be too weak to give the keys the sharp strike they required. Plus, you couldn't even see the paper, and what was the pedal thing for? The machine you use to type today, even if it's not a computer, has been so greatly improved over the original invention that they are no longer the same device.Constant improvement is what we do. So how…
 
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  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
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  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
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  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
 
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  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
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  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • Don't change a thing: 8 inventions that never needed updating

    By Therese Oneill
    20 Nov 2014 | 10:50 am
    If someone presented you with an original 1868 Sholes and Glidden Type-Writer, and told you to write your senior thesis using it, you'd be in for a world of pain. The speed you type with on your close-set keys would be gone, and most of your fingers would be too weak to give the keys the sharp strike they required. Plus, you couldn't even see the paper, and what was the pedal thing for? The machine you use to type today, even if it's not a computer, has been so greatly improved over the original invention that they are no longer the same device.Constant improvement is what we do. So how…
  • Ina Garten's make-ahead Thanksgiving advice

    By Marian Bull
    20 Nov 2014 | 8:54 am
    Pulling off a Thanksgiving dinner without your guests catching you still in your robe, maniacally stirring cranberry sauce with one hand while you stuff your bird with the other, is a level of kitchen preparedness that we all aspire to and only few achieve. The alternative to this disheveled scenario — welcoming your guests fully dressed and groomed and surrounded by an aura of pleasant smells — usually looks something like Ina Garten.In her latest book, Make It Ahead, Ina has a whole slew of day- or week- or morning-before recipes to make us all look a little more put-together...
  • 7 tricks for getting the most out of your credit card points

    By Meghan Rabbitt
    20 Nov 2014 | 6:11 am
    Michelle Schroeder knows how to make the most of her money.Not only did the 25-year-old from St. Louis finish her undergraduate degree in just two and a half years, but she also bought her first house at 20 — thanks to the savings she and her husband built up from working full-time in college.So it's no surprise that when she heard friends talk about redeeming their credit card points for free trips to Europe, the fiscally responsible overachiever wasted no time signing up for a rewards card of her own."I've always had good credit, and I pay my card balance in full each month," she...
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  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
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  • Shoveling snow increases the risk of cardiac arrest

    By <a href="/author/meghan-demaria" ><span class="byline">Meghan DeMaria</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:22 am
    If you live in Buffalo, take note: Shoveling snow could be dangerous for your health.A study from the U.S. Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 1,647 people died between 1990 and 2006 from cardiac injuries related to shoveling snow. The BBC estimates that 100 Americans die shoveling snow every winter, and two have died so far in Buffalo, New York.Barry Franklin, a cardiologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Michigan, told the BBC that young men's heart rates and blood pressure increase more during snow shoveling than during treadmill exercise. "Combine this with cold air, which…
  • The myth of the stay-at-home dad

    By <a href="/author/elissa-strauss" ><span class="byline">Elissa Strauss</span></a>
    21 Nov 2014 | 6:01 am
    I have only good things to say about stay-at-home dads, or SAHDs. They serve as a potent symbolic victory in the struggle to get men to do their fair share of domestic work. They bring a valuable set of fresh eyes to parenting. Plus, they know how to change a diaper and pack a lunch. Really, the only problem I have with them is that, statistically speaking, they barely exist.You might not realize this from the amount of attention they get fromthemedia, including The New York Times who just can't getenough. The Grey Lady's latest was about a recent convention for the National At-Home Dad…
  • How Western companies sneakily sold chemical weapons components to Syria and Iraq

    By Paul Mutter
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:50 am
    Outgoing Foreign Secretary William Hague admitted this week that in the 1980s British companies sold precursor chemicals to the Syrian government that Damascus used to manufacture lethal sarin.But even as late as 2012, British firms were planning to honor contracts to export dual-use chemicals to Syria — in other words, chemicals that could have civilian or military applications. Pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and medicines all contain agents that could also be weapons.German and Indian firms also have legally sold dual-use chemicals to Syria in recent years.Dual-use chemical…
  • How my emergency fund saved me after I got the pink slip

    By Cassandra Murray*, as told to Marianne Hayes
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:43 am
    Not too long ago I was a market research consultant in Baltimore City, Md., living the good life.As a 26-year-old with a $70,000 salary and no debt to speak of, I had enough money in my budget to cover the essentials, splurge on a few "wants" — and divert several hundred dollars each month into an emergency fund. Saving had always been important to me. Growing up, my parents had emphasized the value of having a safety net, and I'd read how crucial it was to fund an account especially for emergencies.But while I knew I was doing the responsible thing by saving — at least in…
  • 6 tiny scientific mistakes that created huge disasters

    By Alison Bruzek
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:36 am
    Even when things go according to plan, applied science is rarely cheap and always complicated — and when things go badly, the smallest mistake can end up costing millions or billions of dollars, and even, sometimes, human lives. Here are six reminders of why it's always good to double-check your work, especially when dealing with spaceflight.(Note: Numbers are not adjusted for inflation.)The crash of NASA's Genesis probeThe mistake: A pair of parts were installed backwardsEstimated cost: Over $260 million(More from World Science Festival: Alan Turing vs. the mechanical Nazi)... More
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